DINOSAURS - WHAT WAS THEIR MODE OF LOCOMOTION AND ADAPTATIONS OF DIET?

Dinosaurs are a source of enormous fascination and ever-growing popularity with people of every age.

Why are they so fascinating? Probably because they seem so amazingly different from the animals we know - bus-sized plant-eaters, hunters with 20 centimetre long serrated teeth, strange creatures with outlandish names. Yet if we only think of dinosaurs as monsters we will never get past the "Did you know" level knowledge about them. The really compelling fascination of dinosaurs is not how different but how similar they are to the animals we know.

Despite their monstrous reputation many dinosaurs were, in fact, no longer than animals that can be found living today. All of them had to meet the same basic challenges of survival. In their search for food and space, their methods of moving and eating and their social organization, dinosaurs show striking similarities to modern groups, particularly birds and mammals. Over the last fifteen years spectacular new discoveries made in the field and laboratory have demonstrated even more clearly how much dinosaurs and todays' animals have in common.

A great deal of research into dinosaurs is currently going on - far too much to allow more than an outline to be given here at this World Wide Web Site. So on drawing on evidence from around the world, the dinosaurs are shown to be a varied, balanced, dymanic community and one of the most spectacular success stories in the history of life on Earth.

For information on the Mode of Locomotion and the Adaptations of Diet: Please Click on the required topic area:

  • THE SUCCESS OF DINOSAURS

  • The Evolution of Locomotion
  • Leg Structure
  • Dinosaur Posture
  • Dinosaur Trackways

  • HOW DID THEY FEED?

  • Deadly Teeth and Jaws
  • Toothless Types
  • The Problems of Eating Plants

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  • Emmajane Trickett of the University of Bristol

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